saece.gif - 2693 Bytes

menu.gif - 6799 Bytes




p1.gif - 3283 Bytes

 

Parent Pages

Click here to see our recommendation for What to pack for preschool

bar.gif - 2827 Bytes

Here is some interesting information you may choose to use:

Helping Your Child Be Healthy and Fit

with activities for children aged 4 through 11

Long-term good health is less an accident than the result of good habits and wise choices. To enjoy good health now and in the future, youngsters must learn how to eat, exercise, sleep, control stress, and be responsible for personal cleanliness and reducing the risk of disease. In addition, they need to be aware of what to do in an emergency and when to say "no".

Habits that include eating nutritious foods and understanding the relationship between physical and emotional health will help your child grow up healthy. Your child's ability to learn and the chances for a longer and more productive life can be greatly improved by developing and following good health practices.

First of All, Your Child Is Special

The mental and emotional health of your child is just as important as physical health. From the earliest moment, a child needs to feel that he or she is special and cared about by family members and friends.

A child who enjoys good mental and emotional health is able to approach new situations with confidence. When children are comfortable with themselves, they can express their emotions in a positive way. As children learn to value themselves and develop confidence in their ability to make responsible decisions, they are building a sense of self-worth or self-esteem.

Parents and teachers share the responsibility for helping children build self-confidence. A child who is confident is more successful in everyday interactions with peers and adults. Confidence in one's ability to learn new and difficult skills can affect future achievement, as well. Developing a trusting relationship with your child, establishing open communication, and recognizing personal achievements are all important. When children know they can do something well, it makes them feel special.

 

* * * * *

 

Table of Contents for the Activities

 

* * * * *

 

Face File

Young children love to cut and paste. They can learn about their emotions at the same time.

What you'll need..

  • Magazines
  • Pieces of cardboard or construction paper
  • Paste or glue
  • Box or folder

What to do

  1. Have your child find pictures in magazines to illustrate different feelings.
  2. Have your child paste each face on cardboard or construction paper.
  3. Together, decide what feeling is expressed by the face and label the picture.
  4. Sort the faces by categories of feelings, such as sad, funny, surprised, happy.
  5. Use a box or folder to file the pictures.

By looking at the pictures, children can recognize how people feel by their facial expressions.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *


A Mirror Of Me

Help your child frame a mirror with items that represent the things your child likes.

What you'll need..

  • Small pocket mirror
  • Lid of a shoebox
  • Magazines, photographs that that can be cut up, paint or an ink pad for thumb prints, or other items that represent your child's interests
  • Scissors if you wish to cut out pictures
  • Glue that is strong enough to hold the mirror

What to do

  1. Help your child attach a small pocket mirror inside the lid of a shoebox.
  2. Have your child decorate the inside of the lid with objects that reflect special interests. Some of the decorations might include
    • a thumb print
    • photographs
    • pictures of favorite foods, sports, and hobbies.
  3. Have your child look into the mirror to see a wonderful face and the things that make it smile!
  4. You might want to hang the framed mirror on the wall of your child's room.

This activity recognizes the things that are important to your child and helps your child realize that an identity is based on one's own interests.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *


A Quilt of Many Feelings

Traditionally, making quilts has been a way for people to express themselves through the use of color and pattern in a practical way. A quilt of faces can help your child understand how emotions are conveyed through facial expressions.

What you'll need..

  • Colored paper
  • Markers or crayons
  • Paste or glue
  • Large piece of paper (poster paper, a large paper bag cut and laid out flat, wrapping or computer paper)

What to do

  1. Using different colors (pastel colors work best), cut the paper into 6" x 6" squares.
  2. Have your child draw faces representing feelings they have had:
    • happy
    • loved
    • sad
    • special
    • good
    • jealous
    • bad
    • lonely
    • pained
  3. Have your child label these emotions.
  4. Paste the squares together on a large piece of paper to resemble a patchwork quilt.

Drawing pictures is one way children have of expressing themselves without feeling self-conscious or embarrassed.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *


My Folder

A folder with your child's name on it can help your child get organized while enhancing self-image.

What you'll need..

  • Dark crayon or marker
  • Large sheet of paper

What to do

  1. Have your child write his or her name or initials many times on a large sheet of paper.
  2. Fold the paper in half to create a folder.
  3. Place pictures, work from school, or drawings that are important to the child in the folder.

Names are very important to children. Just think of how upset they get when they are called names. Talk with your child about his or her name. Is there a favorite nickname? What does the name mean? Was your child named for someone? This is an opportunity for you and your child to talk together to build a strong self-image.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *


This Is the Way We Wash Our Hands

Children have to be reminded to wash their hands. This is a way to turn the reminder into fun.

What you'll need..

  • Paper or cardboard
  • Small slice of soap or a sample soap bar
  • Glue

What to do

  1. Have your child trace around his or her hand on a piece of paper or cardboard.
  2. Cut a small slice of soap from a large soap bar or use a small or sample sized bar of soap.
  3. Glue the soap onto the paper hand.
  4. Hang the poster in the bathroom over the sink to remind your child about hand washing.

Washing your hands is one of the best ways to avoid spreading germs to prevent disease. It is especially important when eating or handling food.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *


Smile If You Like Me

Make a game out of introducing your child to new foods.

What you'll need..

  • Paper
  • Round object
  • Felt tip pen
  • New foods for your child to sample

What to do

  1. Cut paper into three 3"x 3" squares.
  2. On each piece of paper, trace around the bottom of a round object with a felt tip pen.
  3. Have your child draw three different kinds of faces in the circles: a face with a smile, an unhappy face, and a face with a straight line for a mouth to show "I don't care".
  4. Ask your child to try a new or different food. Emphasize that not all the portion has to be eaten: simply try the food and talk about likes and dislikes.
  5. Tell your child to give you one of the faces that reflects the feeling about the new food.
  6. Post a chart to record new foods your child tries.
  7. Set a goal, such as trying one new food a week.
  8. Reward your child for trying the foods by writing "Good job!" on the chart, putting stickers on the chart, or celebrating by taking a trip to the local zoo or library when the chart is complete.

This activity gives your child a chance to enjoy and learn about a variety of foods without the pressure of having to "clean your plate" at mealtime. One point to remember when doing this activity is to try not to use food as a reward or bribe.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *


Follow the Recipe!

One way to get children to eat healthful food, especially vegetables, is to involve them in the selection and preparation of a recipe.

What you'll need..

  • A simple recipe
  • Paper and pencil to write a list
  • Tray
  • Utensils and other equipment with which to cook

What to do

  1. Choose a simple recipe to prepare.
  2. Write a shopping list from the recipe. Check the nutritional value of the ingredients by reading the nutrition label aloud with your child.
  3. Take the children to the market. The supermarket is the perfect place to introduce the older ones to label reading. For children over age 6, see who can find the products with the most sugars, fats, and salt. Explain that the first ingredient listed is what the food has the most of. Then, hunt for alternative, healthier foods.
  4. Allow children to feel the weight and texture of vegetables. Handling fruits and vegetables will help them learn how to distinguish between ripe, unripe, or spoiled produce.
  5. Have children help you put away groceries. Preschoolers enjoy washing fruits and vegetables, and you can explain the proper way to wash them to remove dirt and insecticides. Have them store fresh vegetables in the refrigerator, explaining this will help retain vitamins and help the vegetables stay fresh longer. Have them store root vegetables (potatoes and onions) in a cool, dry place away from light.
  6. Place all the ingredients you will need for the recipe on a tray to make cooking more efficient.
  7. Keep tasks simple and within the child's abilities. Toddlers can stir an egg, mix ingredients, spread jams or peanut butter, or carry pots and pans. Older children love to measure dry ingredients and enjoy the challenge of pouring liquids without spilling.

Pediatricians recommend that parents should get more involved with their children. What better way than by making a game out of cooking, a necessary task but one in which everyone can be involved. Having your children participate in food selection can help you manage food choices for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school children.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *


Oven-Fried Potatoes - This activity requires parental supervision

Here is a healthful recipe that you might want to try.

What you'll need..

  • 3 medium potatoes, peeled or unpeeled
  • 2 tablespoons low calorie margarine, melted
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil
  • Paprika
  • Parmesan cheese, grated (optional)
  1. Cut potatoes lengthwise into strips about 4" x 1/2" x 1/4"
  2. Arrange in a single layer on a nonstick baking sheet.
  3. Pour margarine and oil over potatoes and toss to coat well.
  4. Sprinkle with paprika (young children enjoy doing this).
  5. Bake at 450 degrees for 40 minutes.
  6. Put on serving platter; sprinkle with cheese if desired.

Makes 6 servings

Safety tips in the kitchen:

Children should not be left unsupervised when electrical appliances, flame, or heat are involved. Be extra careful with moving equipment, such as rotary blades of a mixer, food processor, blender, or hand mixer. Knives, scissors, and the like are best for older children. Remind children that handles of utensils on a stove top should be turned inward. Stirring spoons (especially metal ones) should have long handles and be kept away from the heat. Keep an eye on children near stoves, no matter what age and keep small children away from heat of any kind.

Back to the Activities Table of Contents

* * * * *

 

What We Can Do To Help Our Children Learn:

  • Listen to them and pay attention to their problems.
  • Read with them.
  • Tell family stories.
  • Limit their television watching.
  • Have books and other reading materials in the house.
  • Look up words in the dictionary with them.
  • Encourage them to use an encyclopedia.
  • Share favorite poems and songs with them.
  • Take them to the library-get them their own library
  • Take them to museums and historical sites, when possible.
  • Discuss the daily news with them.
  • Go exploring with them and lean about plants, animals, and local geography.
  • Find a quiet place for them to study.
  • Review their homework.
  • Meet with their teachers.

Do you have other ideas?

 

 

 

 

home.gif - 1726 Bytes

Our Program - Parent Pages - Classrooms - Registration

bar.gif - 2827 Bytes